Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 12:07 pm

It's time again for my thread of confusing practice questions! I will try to keep these to only the most egregious questions. First off 3.1 question asks what is the maximum recommended spacing for masonry veneer anchors - the answer is 24" oc horizontally - Ballast asks the same questions and says 16" which one is correct? BTW you gotta love ballast questions - half of them are literally not covered anywhere in their study material - no wonder I get only half the questions right on their tests
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 1:24 pm

Don't shear plates and split rings require drilling into the wood where the connection is made? Don't both need to be "disassembled" to create this connection? What does disassembled even mean here?
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:00 pm

This is one of many f-you questions. If 1 isn't in the answer then how can 5 be too? A shaft gyp of 1" thickness is going to be heavier than the standard weights. I answered C because of this.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:22 pm

I said a. I don't understand how high NRC means low STC when NRC is how much sound something can absorb = reduction in sound. I tried looking this up and no where does it say that high NRC means low STC
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:54 pm

Are you kidding me?!!! Flat roofs obviously mean those which still slope slightly for drainage. They are just fucking with you at this point. Everyone probably asnwered this A - they never mention 4 in their entire book (I have a searchable pdf copy)
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 4:02 pm

Nowhere in the study material do they help you in assessing this question - in fact there's a part which says reheating thermoset plastic roofing (which EPDM is) causes it to lose its shape - wouldn't the roofing being exposed (pavers have gaps) to hot summers in Virginian make is lose its shape? I've notice study material have barely any information on choosing construction systems - anyone have a good source for this seeing as this a big part of PPD?
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 4:12 pm

Huh? I've seen countless details pointing to wood blocking as fire stop - I guess its a misnomer?
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby thd7t » Tue Dec 11, 2018 7:15 am

anonymous283 wrote:Don't shear plates and split rings require drilling into the wood where the connection is made? Don't both need to be "disassembled" to create this connection? What does disassembled even mean here?

anonymous, you love these threads!

I would agree with your first question, though. However, the answer is don't look to Ballast for the answer. Use Fundamentals of Building Design or Building Construction Illustrated to find out spacing for masonry anchors.

Split ring connectors are a destructive connection and cannot be disassembled and then reassembled. Shear plate connectors preserve the strength of the connection, if the assembly has to be taken down and put back up.

The gyp board question is stupid. Agreed.

NRC is a unit of absorption, STC is a unit of reflection. NRC reduces echo in a room, but not transmission from one room to another. STC does the opposite.

The BUR question is silly, but the concepts that they're explaining aren't.

The EPDM question is a little silly, but EPDM is not a thermoplastic. The Virginia part and the rest are pretty silly. Gaps in pavers won't let roofing heat up enough to deform, but using only paths of pavers means a lot of exposed roofing.

Most firestopping I've dealt with has been gypsum or mineral wool. I suspect that FRT wood would be okay, but I'm really not sure. However, the treated wood seems like the only answer that could possibly be wrong, in this case.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:14 am

thank you thd7t! These responses are really helpful for me - I hate ambiguity
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Tue Dec 11, 2018 3:22 pm

I said timber they say beam but they asked for the size groups, which means boards, dimensional lumber, and timber
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:50 am

This question has me confused on the terms: width, breadth, thickness, depth between wood and steel. If a board becomes a beam then its width becomes its depth which is confusing because steel's width is what a wooden beam's depth or thickness is called when its a board right? The correct answer here is the wood's depth but are we talking about shrinkage from top to bottom of joist or side to side if looking at the joist in section? If its tangential and the wood is cut perpendicular to grain (right) then wouldn't it be side to side which is thickness?
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:07 am

The answer is A and I wanted to say A but then I started thinking when was the last time I've seen a control joint in a concrete floor of a lobby. I've seen giant spaces of polished concrete floor without a control joint. I understand control joints are needed for exterior concrete paving every 5 feet but is that the same for interior poured concrete forms?
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:53 am

What is the difference between automatic closing device vs self-closing in fire rated doors? Don't they mean the same thing? This explains it: https://prevent-lss.com/3-types-of-fire ... d-to-know/ but seems weird since it means all class a doors have to have autmoatic closing device doors which are usually in the open position (does it have to be?)
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby thd7t » Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:10 am

anonymous283 wrote:I said timber they say beam but they asked for the size groups, which means boards, dimensional lumber, and timber

You are definitely correct here. Beam describes orientation of force, not nominal size.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby thd7t » Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:12 am

anonymous283 wrote:This question has me confused on the terms: width, breadth, thickness, depth between wood and steel. If a board becomes a beam then its width becomes its depth which is confusing because steel's width is what a wooden beam's depth or thickness is called when its a board right? The correct answer here is the wood's depth but are we talking about shrinkage from top to bottom of joist or side to side if looking at the joist in section? If its tangential and the wood is cut perpendicular to grain (right) then wouldn't it be side to side which is thickness?

Joist is the key word here, because it provides orientation, as you described. This is top to bottom.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby thd7t » Wed Dec 12, 2018 10:14 am

anonymous283 wrote:The answer is A and I wanted to say A but then I started thinking when was the last time I've seen a control joint in a concrete floor of a lobby. I've seen giant spaces of polished concrete floor without a control joint. I understand control joints are needed for exterior concrete paving every 5 feet but is that the same for interior poured concrete forms?

Interior concrete needs control joints as well. People do pour it without them, but it is not a best practice. 20'x20' is a pretty standard maximum.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Fri Dec 14, 2018 2:08 pm

I thought for sure this was going to be Louisiana because of the porch covering the south windows and the rooms being open to each other allowing for cross ventilation. Also if this building type is found in Maryland then it would probably work in Vermont too which is still temperate.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby anonymous283 » Fri Dec 14, 2018 2:56 pm

This question makes no sense to me at all - if the sound is 65db 3 feet away - we don't know the db at the source and 12 feet away from source is 9 feet away from the sound being at 65db so its not 12 db of reduction...
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby Coach » Fri Dec 14, 2018 3:54 pm

anonymous283 wrote:This question makes no sense to me at all - if the sound is 65db 3 feet away - we don't know the db at the source and 12 feet away from source is 9 feet away from the sound being at 65db so its not 12 db of reduction...

3' is the given baseline of 65db. Double to 6' = 59db. Double 6' = 12' = 59db-6 = 53db.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby kkriegs » Sat Dec 22, 2018 3:15 pm

anonymous283 wrote:This is one of many f-you questions. If 1 isn't in the answer then how can 5 be too? A shaft gyp of 1" thickness is going to be heavier than the standard weights. I answered C because of this.


1" is not a standard gyp board thickness. This question assumes a single layer of gyp board will not be more than 5/8" thick. I agree that it is intentionally tricky, however. The concept is that the thicker the gyp board, the sturdier the framing needs to be. They could have tested that without going into layers vs. thickness of a single layer.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby kkriegs » Sat Dec 22, 2018 3:24 pm

anonymous283 wrote:I said a. I don't understand how high NRC means low STC when NRC is how much sound something can absorb = reduction in sound. I tried looking this up and no where does it say that high NRC means low STC


NRC relates to reverberation and sound absorption (how sound acts WITHIN a space), but not to transmission (how sound travels from one space through a material to another space). Solid materials have a high STC rating, meaning they do not permit as much sound to travel from one space to another. Those same materials would have a low NRC since they would be more likely to reflect sound back into the room in which the sound originates--causing an echo.

The explanation Ballast gave illustrates the opposite scenario, with high NRC & low STC. Imagine a room constructed of carpet or acoustical ceiling tiles (supporting structure and gravity aside). Both of those materials are porous and therefore have a high NRC, so there would be little reverberation (echoing) within the space. However because they are so porous, they would permit sound to travel through them easily.
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Re: Practice Question Confusion Resolution

Postby kkriegs » Sat Dec 22, 2018 3:32 pm

anonymous283 wrote:Huh? I've seen countless details pointing to wood blocking as fire stop - I guess its a misnomer?


The key word is FIREstop, as opposed to DRAFTstop. The combustible wood could be a draft stop, but not a firestop. I think that a firestop must not be combustible because it is assumed it would be likely to come in direct contact with fire and must stay intact, whereas a draftstop would be in a location where it would be less likely to come in direct contact with fire (or contact would be delayed) as long as there is no draft pulling the fire in that direction.
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